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Baltimore wakes up to Confederate monuments gone

Four Confederate monuments were quietly removed Tuesday night

WYPR News

A statue of former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger B. Taney is slated to be removed from the State House grounds after a key state committee voted by email this week. Taney is best known for writing the 1857 Dred Scott decision that upheld slavery.

But a day after the State House Trust voted, Senate President Mike Miller jumped to Taney’s defense.

Documenting Hate

Aug 16, 2017

Driven by the lack of reliable data on the number of hate crimes that occur in the U.S., ProPublica, an independent, nonprofit newsroom recently joined with partners to launch Documenting Hate, an initiative that collects stories about bias incidents and hate crimes. 

National and local data, user-submitted reports, and social media monitoring will allow journalists and civil rights groups to get a more accurate picture of hate crimes and acts of intimidation--in person and online. 

P. Kenneth Burns

Earlier this year, Baltimore entered into a consent decree with the Department of Justice to reform the city police department. As part of the agreement, an independent monitor will keep track of the changes made and report publicly on the progress.

Tuesday night, the city hosted the first of two forums where community members could hear from the four finalists considered for monitors.

WYPR's Matt Tacka and Rachel Baye discuss what happened at the forum and the process for selecting the monitor.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Two weeks ago, state officials gathered in a shopping center parking lot in Dundalk to declare August first Henrietta Lacks Day. Last night, the Baltimore City Council adopted a resolution to follow suit. The resolution honors the woman whose cancer cells, taken by Johns Hopkins doctors in 1951 without her knowledge or consent, led to advances in treatment of polio, cancer, HIV/AIDS and other diseases.

Lack of patient consent, compounded by a history of mistrust of medical institutions, still reverberates in Baltimore’s gay black community.

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WYPR Presents Humorist David Sedaris

Thursday, October 12 @ 7 pm, The Hippodrome

Out of the Blocks

all photos by Wendel Patrick

1100 Ward Street, Part 3

It’s hard to write a 'spoiler-free' description of this episode because these stories from 1100 Ward Street take so many surprise twists. Let's just say we meet a man who almost got to play with The Orioles, a guy who ended up becoming friends with a woman who stabbed him, a woman who survived a house fire, a man who got the closest thing he ever had to a father figure when he was behind bars, and a repo man who struggles to make his own car payments.

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More Than Words

Jonna McKone

Episode #7: Creativity As A Form Of Activism

For our final More Than Words story, Xavier started out interested in how activists in Baltimore see their work in the city as connected to and inspired by Civil Rights struggles of the past. As he researched and conducted interviews for this piece, he found writing to be an overlooked form of activism and decided to sit down with one of his favorite authors, D. Watkins.

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It was the year 2000 and Maine's governor at the time, Angus King, was excited about the Internet. The World Wide Web was still relatively young but King wanted every student in the state to have access to it.

"Go into history class and the teacher says, 'Open your computer. We're going to go to rome.com and we're going to watch an archaeologist explore the Catacombs this morning in real time.' What a learning tool that is!"

The U.S. Navy has relieved the USS Fitzgerald's commander and two other senior leaders of their duties — and it's also praising the crew for saving their ship after the destroyer collided with a large Philippine-flagged container ship off the coast of Japan on June 17.

When was the last time you used the entire container of fresh herbs you bought at the store? Never? Me too. Every time a recipe calls for 1-2 tablespoons of freshly chopped sprigs, I head to a supermarket and reach for a plastic container holding at least three times as much as I need. A few days later, I'm standing by the trashcan observing a moment of silence before I discard a plastic coffin of wasted, withered basil.

Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona, was an early supporter of President Trump and often praises him. But he says he has not heard directly from Trump since the president said he was seriously considering pardoning Arpaio on a recent conviction for criminal contempt of court.

From the thirteenth floor of a glass tower at the Oregon Health & Science University, you get a panoramic view of downtown Portland and the majestic mountains in the distance. But it's what's happening inside the building that's brought me here.

"Should we go do this thing?" lab manager Amy Koski asks.

Spectators around the country are gearing up, eclipse glasses at the ready, for the solar eclipse on Aug. 21. But another group — perhaps more anxious than eager — is preparing as well: the people who run California's electric grid.

California is home to almost half of all the solar power in the country. So, even a partial loss of the sun will mean a major dip in the energy supply.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A member of Congress who's one of the staunchest defenders of Russia in American politics met with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in London on Wednesday.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., spent around three hours with Assange talking at the Ecuadorean Embassy there, where Assange sought refuge in 2012 in the face of sexual assault charges in Sweden.

A statue of former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger B. Taney is slated to be removed from the State House grounds after a key state committee voted by email this week. Taney is best known for writing the 1857 Dred Scott decision that upheld slavery.

But a day after the State House Trust voted, Senate President Mike Miller jumped to Taney’s defense.

The recent violence in Charlottesville, Va., amplified an ongoing struggle in America about who experiences discrimination and to what extent. Many of the white nationalists who rallied in Charlottesville, for example, feel that white people are discriminated against as much as, or more than, minority groups.

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